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The Fecal Manpurse: A Survivor Amp; 39;s Guide To Colon Cancer Download 2021.zip


# The Fecal Manpurse: A Survivor's Guide to Colon Cancer ## Introduction - What is colon cancer and why is it important to know about it? - How the author survived colon cancer and wrote a book about his experience - What is the fecal manpurse and how does it help with recovery? - What are the main topics covered in this article? ## What is Colon Cancer? - A type of cancer that starts in the large intestine or rectum - The third most common type of cancer in the United States - Usually begins as small, noncancerous clumps of cells called polyps that can become cancerous over time - Symptoms may include changes in bowel habits, blood in stool, abdominal pain, weakness, weight loss, etc. - Stages range from 0 to 4, depending on how far the cancer has spread ## How to Prevent and Detect Colon Cancer - The best way to prevent colon cancer is to get regular screening tests that can find and remove polyps before they turn into cancer - Screening tests include colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, stool tests, etc. - Screening recommendations vary depending on age, family history, personal history, and other risk factors - Other ways to lower the risk of colon cancer include eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, avoiding smoking and excessive alcohol, etc. ## How to Treat Colon Cancer - Treatment options depend on the stage, location, and type of colon cancer, as well as the patient's preferences and overall health - Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, etc. - Surgery may involve removing part or all of the colon or rectum, creating an opening (stoma) for waste to leave the body (colostomy or ileostomy), or attaching a pouch (fecal manpurse) to collect waste - Chemotherapy may be given before or after surgery, or alone if surgery is not possible - Radiation therapy may be used to shrink tumors, kill cancer cells, or relieve symptoms - Targeted therapy and immunotherapy are newer types of drugs that work by blocking specific molecules or stimulating the immune system to fight cancer ## How to Cope with Colon Cancer - Colon cancer can affect not only the physical health but also the emotional and social well-being of patients and their loved ones - Coping strategies may include seeking support from family, friends, professionals, or support groups; learning more about the disease and treatment; expressing feelings and concerns; managing stress and anxiety; etc. - Coping with a stoma or a fecal manpurse may require some adjustments in lifestyle, diet, hygiene, clothing, etc. - Coping with side effects of treatment may involve taking medications, using complementary therapies, following dietary guidelines, etc. ## Conclusion - Colon cancer is a serious but treatable disease that can be prevented or detected early by regular screening tests - The author of the book "The Fecal Manpurse" shares his personal story of surviving colon cancer and recovering with the help of a pouch that collects his waste - The book offers humor, insight, and advice for anyone facing colon cancer or supporting someone who does - The main topics covered in this article are what is colon cancer, how to prevent and detect it, how to treat it, and how to cope with it ## FAQs - Q: What are the signs and symptoms of colon cancer? - A: Some common signs and symptoms of colon cancer are changes in bowel habits (such as diarrhea, constipation, or narrow stools), blood in stool or rectal bleeding, abdominal pain or cramps, weakness or fatigue, unexplained weight loss, etc. However, some people may not have any symptoms at all in the early stages of the disease. Therefore, it is important to get regular screening tests that can find and remove polyps before they turn into cancer. - Q: How often should I get screened for colon cancer? - A: The frequency and type of screening tests for colon cancer depend on your age, personal history, family history, and other risk factors. In general, most people should start getting screened at age 45 and continue until age 75. Some people may need to start earlier or continue longer based on their risk factors. Some common screening tests are colonoscopy (every 10 years), sigmoidoscopy (every 5 years), stool tests (every year), etc. Talk to your doctor about which screening test is right for you and how often you should get it done. - Q: What are the treatment options for colon cancer? - A: The treatment options for colon cancer depend on the stage, location, and type of the cancer, as well as your preferences and overall health. Some common treatment options are surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, etc. Surgery may involve removing part or all of the colon or rectum, creating an opening (stoma) for waste to leave the body (colostomy or ileostomy), or attaching a pouch (fecal manpurse) to collect waste. Chemotherapy may be given before or after surgery, or alone if surgery is not possible. Radiation therapy may be used to shrink tumors, kill cancer cells, or relieve symptoms. Targeted therapy and immunotherapy are newer types of drugs that work by blocking specific molecules or stimulating the immune system to fight cancer. - Q: What is a fecal manpurse and how does it work? - A: A fecal manpurse is a pouch that is attached to the abdomen to collect waste after surgery for colon cancer. It is also known as a J-pouch, an ileoanal reservoir, or an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). It is created by using a part of the small intestine (ileum) to form a reservoir that connects to the anus. The pouch acts as a substitute for the removed part of the colon or rectum and allows the patient to have normal bowel movements through the anus. The pouch may take some time to adjust and function properly, and may require some changes in diet, hygiene, and lifestyle. - Q: Where can I find more information and support for colon cancer? - A: There are many sources of information and support for colon cancer patients and their loved ones. Some examples are the American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org), the Colon Cancer Coalition (www.coloncancercoalition.org), the Colorectal Cancer Alliance (www.ccalliance.org), the National Cancer Institute (www.cancer.gov), etc. You can also ask your doctor, nurse, social worker, or other health care providers for referrals to local resources and support groups. You can also read books, blogs, podcasts, etc. that share personal stories and experiences of colon cancer survivors, such as "The Fecal Manpurse" by Mike Harsh.




The Fecal Manpurse: A Survivor amp; 39;s Guide To Colon Cancer Download.zip

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